Tag Archives: crime fiction

THE SINGING SANDS by Josephine Tey (1952)

Scottish Island Fiction     Mystery Fiction

singing sands

This is Josephine Tey’s last novel, discovered in her papers after her death, and published posthumously.  She is probably better know for her 1951 novel THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, a  book that has graced a number of top ten mystery novel lists in the past sixty-five years not to mention some required reading lists for college courses (a friend of mine took such a course).  I read that novel over thirty years ago and, although I don’t agree with all the conclusions set forth in that book, I think it did open my eyes to the way history is recorded.

 But back to THE SINGING SANDS.  This is the oldest book I’ve included in my “Scottish Island” series but I think it has a lot to offer to anyone who enjoys reading novels about Scottish Islands.  Only part of the book takes place on the fictional island of Cladda but the character has  lots to say about the effects of visiting the Island.  

The novel opens with Inspector Alan Grant of Scotland Yard enduring the overnight train ride to the Scottish Highlands.  I say “enduring” because Inspector Grant is suffering from  nervous disorders, including claustrophobia, and the small, enclosed sleeper car is agonizing for him.  He departs from the train, after a sleepless night, only to catch the porter trying to wake another passenger;  it’s not going to happen – the man is dead.  Later Grant realizes that he has somehow obtained a newspaper belonging to the dead man and it has a wee poem scribbled in the margins. The poem intrigues him  – so much so that he begins to obsess about it when he is supposed to be enjoying rest and relaxation with his cousin’s family.  The poem leads him im many directions as he tries to discover more about the dead man on the train.

The mystery is intriguing but there are other angles of this book that are also interesting.  Mental health issues are served up 1951 style.  He is on sabatical on the orders of his physician yet it is actually painful when he berates himself for being so “weak.”  His boss is not a supportive man but fortunately his family are quite supportive.

He spends some time on a Scottish Island and fans of these islands will enjoy his reaction to his temporary residence. That’s all I will say.

An excellent novel- even after 65 years.

The Singing Sands by Josephine Tey, 1952, Random House, 246 pages

Post Script

I need to quickly add something because I forgot to include Inspector Grant’s theory on vanity;  “Vanity.  The first requisite in wrong doing.  The constant factor in the criminal mind.” p. 195

“When you say vanity, you are thinking of the kind that admires itself in mirrors and buys things to deck itself out in.  But that is merely personal conceit.  Real vanity is quite different.  A matter not of person but of personality.  Vanity says “I must have this because I am me”.  It is a frightening thing because it is incurable.  You can never convince Vanity that anyone else is of the slightest importance; he just doesn’t understand what you are talking about.  He will kill a person rather than be put to the inconvenience of doing a six months’ stretch”. p.200

Vanity – an interesting perspective.

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THE LONG AND FARAWAY GONE by Lou Berney (2015)

the long and faraway gone

Crime Fiction

This is a novel I read about a year ago and I loved it – so why has it taken me so long to put this review to paper? That’s a great question,  and the nearest I can come to an answer is to say that I just didn’t feel like I could do it justice. This is terrific crime novel featuring a current case and two cold cases but it is also so much more… Some readers will appreciate the trip down memory lane to the eighties, the clothes and music, it brings it back.  Other  readers might be anticipating the resolutions of the three main cases.  But for me – well – I have to admit I just love the way the author nailed “the nature of memory” It doesn’t hurt to have a likable (though flawed) protagonist with a sense of humour that is pointed, yet considerate of the difficult subject material.

This is fiction although it was loosely based on a true crime that happened in another year.

In this imagined account of the summer of 1986, Oklahoma City is rocked by two tragedies.  A botched burglary at a local movie theater ends with the murder of six young employees, and a few months later a young teenager disappears at a local fair.  Neither crime is solved.

 Wyatt was sixteen that summer and inexplicably he was the only survivor at the theater massacre.  It changed him forever: he moved away, changed his name and never looked back. 

Julianna is the sister of the missing teenager. Unlike Wyatt, she stayed in Oklahoma where she obsessively tried to unravel the mystery of her missing sibling. The evening her sister disappeared has never left her mind.

It is 26 years later in 2012 and Wyatt is a private investigator in Las Vegas.  A friend asks him to take a case in Omaha (as a favour— double pay) and Wyatt grudgingly accepts.  Oops! What the friend meant to say was Oklahoma, and soon  Wyatt finds himself heading back to a place he has avoided for 26 years.  And he starts to remember things about that summer.  This is where the author is brilliant at showing how the five senses trigger memory – and this is a guy who doesn’t want to remember.  As soon as he sees the city skyline his stomach clenches. The scent after the rain, the taste of the food,  the sounds unique to this city;  they generate the memories of that summer and he is soon asking himself why was I the only survivor?

But memories can be fickle companions and Julianne is not having much luck remembering the night her sister vanished.  Until…

This is a tremendous story that is well told and meaningful.  A true gem – and there must be folks who agree with me because it has won a few awards  ( among them an Edgar.)

The Long and Far Away Gone, 2015, HarperCollins,  454 pages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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