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THE SEA DETECTIVE by Mark Douglas-Home (2015)

Scottish Crime Fiction

Scottish Island Fiction

This novel has so many of the elements that I love in a book that I was almost certain I was going to love it before I had even read a single page: I wasn’t disappointed. The main character is an oceanographer, working out of Edinburgh,  named Cal McGill who has pioneered a program for using ocean currents, weather records, shipping documents, archives, wind speeds and a host of other information to explain the physical origin of items (or bodies and body parts) washing up on a shore. Where did the journey begin? He is also an eco-warrior attempting to bring attention to global warming and  a loner who uses a bunch of anonymous beachcombers to feed him information.

Cal’s interest in the ocean was kindled in his youth when he discovered his grandfather had died during World War ll, after being washed overboard during a mission. He has an over-riding interest in discovering all the facts regarding this event.  The small Scottish Island that had been home to this branch of his family for generations was abandoned after the war and many pieces of this puzzle just do not fit.  This is my favourite plot line because I adore stories involving Scottish Islands.  Peter May’s BLACK HOUSE trilogy is tremendous and I recommend it to any fans of this novel.

There is also a subplot featuring a young Indian girl exploited by a prostitution/pedophile ring. A third subplot revolves around the mystery of shoe clad feet coming ashore in strangely diverse locations.

.There is a secondary character – a policewoman named Helen Jamieson- and I hope I see her in future installments. Oh yes, there are already two more installments in this series…yippee.

So here it is in a nutshell.. a crime mystery, an interesting protagonist, and a Scottish Island. What is there not to love?

Published by Penguin Random House

383 Pages

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HIS BLOODY PROJECT by Graeme Macrae Burnet (2015)

Fiction

project

This novel was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize in 2016 and, although it didn’t win, the nomination will give the novel oodles of exposure. It’s a historical thriller that is a little difficult to categorize but the author himself has said it’s “a novel about a crime rather than a crime novel” That sounds right. The multiple perspective format allows the reader to almost be the detective; taking in the information and sifting through the often contradictory evidence.

This is not a whodunnit since we learn almost immediately that the protagonist -a youth by the name of  Roderick Macrae – had readily admitted to the killing of three people in his Scottish Highland crofting community in 1869. But why? Roddy’s advocate (lawyer) tasks him with writing an account of his life and the circumstances proceeding  the murders along with details of the actual killings.  The resulting narrative is a grim and gloomy representation of a life saturated with hopelessness where the churchy types embrace providence -” it is the will of God”- sort of thinking.  The death of his mother and then the wrath of a bully-man add further darkness to an already bleak existence.

Roddy’s personal narrative accounts for over half of the novel but there are other perspectives to consider. The reader is privy to the court proceedings, newspaper stories, medical and coroner’s report, character assessments, and other cronicles. An expert on lunacy examines Roddy and gives testimony that might have been darkly funny if it hadn’t been so disturbing.

Of course nothing is straight forward…and that is the point, I think.  Extenuating circumstances — maybe —maybe not!

I found this to be a fascinating and rewarding novel.

HIS BLOODY PROJECT Documents relating to the case of Roderick Macrae… by Graeme Macrae Burnet   Contraband Publishing (2015) 288 pages

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THE ISLAND HOUSE …by Posie Graeme-Evans (2012)

SCOTTISH ISLAND FICTIONisland house

I adore Scottish Island fiction and I was fortunate to find this novel at my local library. This is a dual-timeline story where both narratives center around a Scottish Island called Findnar (a fictional island) In the modern tale, the reader is introduced to young grad student named Freya Dane, who has just inherited an Island from her recently-deceased archeologist father. Freya had been estranged from her father for many years but she is also an archeologist and she is curious to learn more about his research – and maybe more about him.

The narrative switches back and forth between Freya’s story and the story of Signy – a Pictish girl in 800A.D. The time period is significant because it was a time of conflict between the Vikings, the Picts, and the newly arrived Christian community.  Signy’s entire family is slaughtered in a Viking raid and she taken in by the Christian community survivors. She also falls in love with an injured Viking youth left behind by the raiders. This story-line is interesting and  I’m thinking that the appeal should be quite timely; especially since tv shows like “The Last Kingdom” and “Game of Thrones”  have popularized hairy, tattooed men with swords, and clubs, and berserker warriors. Fun stuff.

Signy’s story is really quite interesting but I have to admit that I found Freya’s story dull . And her romance – yawn.

THE ISLAND HOUSE   Atria Paperback   2012   448 pages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE ICE TWINS by S. K. Tremayne

Scottish Island Fictionice twins

“It is a traumatized yet beautiful landscape” p. 70

The Scottish Island in this novel is the perfect choice for a creepy thriller like “The Ice Twins”. Allow me to do a checklist; remote–yes, isolated– very,  unpredictable weather–you bet, unreliable communication–no wifi or cell service on this island. If that’s not enough- well, the locals call this Island a “thin place”, somewhere between our world and the next.  And this particular Island has been uninhabited for two decades, so throw in a dilapidated old house with lots of drafts and a vermin problem and this is the setting for this chilling thriller.

The “just-barely-functioning” Moorcroft family have quit London and  decided to take up residence on this Island off the coast of Skye, after the father (Angus) inherited the land from his Grandmother.  They have had a bad couple of years (understatement). It has been just over a year since one of their identical twin daughters died in an accident and the surviving twin, Kirstey (or is it Lydia) has been experiencing behavioural problems. Angus was fired from his job and Sarah (mother) is overwhelmed with grief and guilt. There is also a problem involving the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Somehow, moving to this spooky island is going to help? Is there method to this madness?

The story is told by alternating the points of view between Angus and Sarah. Personally, I was surprised by some of the twists and turns. The author manages to use the eerie setting  to great advantage and some of the characters are soooo… creepy.

The author is a travel writer and this Island is based on an island he visited in his youth. There are photos that accompany the text and I can only assume that they are from this same island; Eilean Sionnach. I like the photos – they’re a nice touch.

THE ICE TWINS by S. k. Tremayne

Grand Central Publishing, 2015

 

 

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World War 1 Mystery Series part 3

Capturewent waterafterlionMy last few blog entries have revolved around mystery series set during (or in the aftermath) of World War 1.  I would like to continue that theme with this post about three mystery series that may be of interest to anyone who appreciates historical mystery fiction of this era. All three of these mystery series take place after the war  but they all incorporate elements of he war, and in some cases the actual answer to the mystery can be found directly in something that happened during the war. All of the novels on this page feature strong, intelligent women as the main characters

Daisy Dalrymple is a character created by Carola Dunn with her first adventure being “DEATH AT WENTWATER COURT” (1994) and then followed by 20 more entries. The reader will learn early in the first novel that Daisy was the privileged child of an Earl but after the war (and because of the war) her circumstances changed dramatically.  Her beloved brother Gervais died during the fighting and was buried somewhere in France. Her father died immediately following the war from the Spanish Flu. The Dalrymple money and estate were entailed and thus it was left to a distant cousin. Daisy’s fiance was a Quaker and a “conscientious objector” but he worked as an ambulance driver near the front and he was also killed. To keep busy (and to make money) Daisy began to write successful magazine articles.  Her stories on the” Grand Old Estates” allowed for her to travel. In the first novel Daisy meets an interesting fellow – DCI Fletcher, himself a widower after his wife died from the Spanish Flu. Oh yeah…..and there’s a murder. These novels, although the subject matter can be intense, tend to be more like a cozy and less gritty than some other series of this era.

The next series is actually one of my favourites during this era–the DANDY GILVER series by Catriona McPherson  with the first entry being “After the Armistice Ball (2005). This  first novel is set among the struggling upper classes, in the aftermath of World War 1. We meet a character named Alex who has just inherited an estate , even though he was a second son. His older brother died in the war. A lot of things just aren’t the way they were meant to be. Dandy and Alex become WORK partners and I just love their witty banter, and the droll insight. They are at their absolute best when their  investigations bring them to areas of Scotland where the superstitions and customs may seem ridiculous but they’re brilliant at separating the chaff from the wheat. And the war does figure directly in some of the entries, for example, they have a case that involved a “conchie”–that would be slang for conscientious objector. In one telling but simple scene, Dandy is talking to a woman about her  own school age sons and, without thinking she asks the woman if she has sons. She realised her mistake immediately as the woman’s face crumpled in on itself.  After the war a person NEVER asked a stranger about their sons. This series has 10 titles.

Jade del Cameron is  another strong female character written by Suzanne Arruda with the first entry of the series called “THE MARK OF THE LION”(2006) Jade was an ambulance driver during WW1 where her pilot boyfriend downed his plane very near to where she was working. His dying wish was for her to travel to Africa and find his illegitimate brother. In truth I found this to be more of an “African Adventure series ” rather than a “WW1” series but an interesting read all the same.

I am very excited about my next blog post–I will be combining two of my favourite elements of fiction.  I love fiction about Scottish Islands, I have written many blogs about this subject in past posts.  And I also love World War 1 fiction so I am going present some Scottish Island fiction set during World War1.

 

 

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THE SUMMER OF THE BEAR……by Bella Pollen (2010, Mantle)

bearA book in my series featuring fiction novels with Scottish Island Settings.

The year is 1979 and the Fleming family are living in Bonn Germany where father Nicky is a diplomat. When he dies suddenly under mysterious circumstances mother Letty relocates her family to  her childhood home on an Island in the Hebrides. Letty and her three children are trying to come to terms with his death but the bizarre and unexpected nature of his demise make it more difficult. The youngest son Jamie is convinced that his father is still alive so he  leaves maps for his father to find .  At the same time a  grizzly bear has escaped from his keeper and was last seen on the Scottish West Coast. Young Jamie is convinced that the bear is somehow connected to his father.

This book is many things. There is a mystery–certainly we want to understand more about the father’s death especially since he was in diplomatic service during the cold war–so was it an accident? suicide? or maybe murder?  It is the story of the family members, different personalities with different relationships with Nicky, trying to understand this death. The eldest daughter Georgie has always been the responsible one but she knows something that she doesn’t want to know.  Middle daughter Alba is consumed by hate (for everything but mostly for Jamie). Young Jamie is a very special child; at eight-years-old he can neither read nor write but he processes an almost magical thinking that endears him to some and alienates him from others.

And there is the search for the bear…..

Very interesting;   In 1980 a bear did escape from his trainer and spent 4 weeks on an Island in the Outer Hebrides. More information in the book’s epilogue.

I thought this book was very unique – perhaps a little slow at times – but worth it.

An Oprah pick in 2011.

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THE OTHER CHILD ……. by Charlotte Link (2013)

other childIt has been some time since I posted on my blog so I will start with a book that I read very recently and then I can tackle some of the books I have read during my absence. “The Other Child” is a psychological suspense novel written by an author named Charlotte Link who is hugely popular in her native Germany but not well known in North America.   I think this  might change. I have read novels in the European/Scandinavian genre before but I have a confession to make– I tend to  get bogged down with the proper names; those impossible combinations of vowels and letters (and little dots) that form the names of people, places and even street names. My poor brain just stumbles over these unfamiliar words and the resulting confusion really puts a damper on my reading experience.  Well my poor brain was happy with this novel.  Not only does it take place in England but people have names like Dave, Chad and Leslie. Yeah.

This is a suspenseful, multilayered double murder mystery with a thread going back to World War ll. The reader is introduced to the  characters before their connection is known.  This is one of those novels where very little should be divulged to the new reader so I will take my advice and say no more about the plot.  I do think this would appeal to fans of psychological suspense fiction.

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DEAFENING…..by Frances Itani (2003)

Historical Fiction

WWI Fiction

This is a novel that sent me on an emotional roller coaster ride. It is primarily the story of a girl named Grania who becomes deaf, at age five, after suffering through scarlet fever. Her mother refuses to accept Grania’s deafness but her grandmother (Mamo) is relentless in teaching her to read and speak. The description of Mamo’s patience and commitment is truly memorable and Grania’s progress is inspiring.  She is nine years old when the family makes the difficult decision to send her to a special boarding school for the deaf.  She must leave her small-town Canadian home and live in another city without her family. Although she is heartbroken at first, she eventually excels in the deaf school. The first 1/3 of the book tells the story of Grania growing up, meeting a man named Jim Lloyd, and getting married.

Their marriage takes place in 1915 and soon  Jim is heading to Europe  to be a soldier in WWI.  The novel describes the horror of his existence as a stretcher-bearer on the front lines in France. Grania moves back with her family and lives through the difficult war years in her home -town, assisting the war movement and the family.  Both Jim and Grania witness tragedy and death in their respective locations. Despite the separation, there is a deep devotion between them.

I won’t describe the novel anymore except to say it is very moving.  My own grandfather, who died  when I was very young, was a stretcher -bearer in WWl and I did not know or understand that he lived through such horror. It impressed me, and it distressed me.

This is a very fine story about commitment and devotion.

HarperCollins Publishers (2003)

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A Duty to the Death….by Charles Todd (2009)

Historical Fiction, Mystery Fiction;

This novel begins on Tuesday 21 November, 1916. 8:00a.m. aboard the HMHS (His Majesty’s  Hospital Ship ) Britannic.    Britannic had been requisitioned as a hospital ship with the onset of WWI and was travelling to collect wounded from Greek Macedonia, Palestine,  and Mesopotamia. The time and the date are important because 12 minutes later, at 8:12 a.m, an explosion rocked the ship. (Probably a mine) Fifty-five minutes later the HMHS Britannic was lost beneath the sea. The Britannic had been a sister ship of the Titanic and many improvements had been undertaken so this ship could avoid the fate of the Titanic. Unfortunately, simple human error was probably responsible for its quick sinking ; the nurses had opened all the portholes on that fresh and breezy day to air out the chambers.There were adequate lifeboats (unlike the Titanic)  and the final death toll was 30 men . This much is a fairly accurate account of the sinking of the Britannic .

And now to the story–or shall we say fiction. Bess Crawford is a nurse and a survivor of the Britannic. She is sent home to England to recover from a nasty broken arm and she has another mission that she is determined to complete during her leave. A soldier she had nursed  made her promise to fulfill his dying wish.  He wanted her to visit his family in Kent and give them a fairly simple-sounding message.  She had agreed to do this but  put it off more than once.  Her near-death experience makes her realize that her life could end at any time and she better fulfill that promise.

The family is visited and the message is delivered.  The family  appear indifferent.

During her short visit to this small village, Bess is called upon for her nursing skills.  The local doctor asks for her help with a shell-shocked patient and then she must nurse  a pneumonia patient, the brother of the soldier responsible for her visit.  She begins to put pieces together regarding the message and the family but much of it doesn’t make sense. eventually she must leave the village but this mystery won’t leave her alone.

This is another story about the devastation of war–even far from the battlefields. 

A very worthwhile read.

Interesting tidbit—Charles Todd is actually a mother-son writing team.

Harper-Collins Publishers (2009)

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I Am Half-Sick of Shadows…….by Alan Bradley

Historical Mystery

A Flavia de Luce Mystery

Post War England

This is the fourth book in a mystery series featuring the precocious, self-taught, 11-year old chemist–Flavia de Luce.  I can’t imagine any 11-year-old being this smart but then, I suppose I can’t imagine any household being visited by four murders in one year either. The beauty of fiction. I like  following  a series since each book wraps up a nice little who-done-it yet there are other mysteries unravelling slowly–like a soap opera.  It certainly keeps me watching for the next book in the series to be released.

This book has a Christmas background .  Father is almost completely out of funds so he reluctantly rents the entire Buckshaw Estate to a film company. Flavia and  her two sisters, beautiful Ophelia and bookworm Daphne, are excited about the impending film shoot and the townspeople at nearby Bishop Lacey are thrilled to have movie stars in their midst. A special Christmas eve fund-raiser for the church is planned at the estate–but of course, all does not go smoothly. A blizzard strands the household and then there is a murder .It’s a little Agatha Christie-like (which is referenced in the book) but definitely entertaining.

The  main characters reveal a few more secrets; just enough to keep the reader anticipating the next book . A quick and enjoyable read.

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